Organizational Anger Management/Emotional Intelligence

November 5, 2010
8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Anderson & Anderson
12301 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 418
Los Angeles, CA 90025
(310) 207-3591

Cost: $250.00

Anderson & Anderson APC

Anger Management Guru: George Anderson, BCD, LCSW, CAMF

 

 Live Anger Management Continuing Education Seminar

Approved for 8 CEU’s by CAADAC (#2n96-341-0805), BBS (#PCE60), CAADE (#CP40-793-C-1009), TCBAP, and the CA. Board of Corrections

The Anderson & Anderson model of anger management is the most effective and widely recognized curriculum in the world. This model, which has been featured in Los Angeles Times Magazine, focuses on enhancing emotional intelligence and assertive communication while introducing behavior strategies for identifying and managing anger and stress. Our certification training and approved provider list are the industry standards and dominate the internet.

This seminar will focus on Organizational Anger Management/Emotional Intelligence. This training is designed to further empower the participant to offer workshops or presentations regarding anger management, civility or emotional intelligence a small group format. This is rapidly becoming one of the most requested interventions in anger management. This training has been conducted for Kaiser Permanente of Southern California the Riverside County Medical Association as well as the Illinois State Bar Association.

This class satisfies 8 of the total 16 CEUs required for annual certification adherence.

**Please be advised that December 31st is the deadline for completion of the 16 CEUs for the year.

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Emotional Intelligence for Couples

November 4, 2010
8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Anderson & Anderson
12301 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 418
Los Angeles, CA 90025
(310) 207-3591

Cost: $250.00


Anderson & Anderson APC


Anger Management Guru: George Anderson, BCD, LCSW, CAMF

 Live Anger Management Continuing Education Seminar

Approved for 8 CEU’s by CAADAC (#2n96-341-0805), BBS (#PCE60), CAADE (#CP40-793-C-1009), TCBAP, and the CA. Board of Corrections

The Anderson & Anderson model of anger management is the most effective and widely recognized curriculum in the world. This model, which has been featured in Los Angeles Times Magazine, focuses on enhancing emotional intelligence and assertive communication while introducing behavior strategies for identifying and managing anger and stress. Our certification training and approved provider list are the industry standards and dominate the internet.

This seminar will focus on Emotional Intelligence for Couples and will use the trusted Anderson model. Material covered will include skill enhancement in anger management, stress management, empathy and assertive communication, as it relates to couples specifically, and relationships in general. The all-around goal is enhanced EQ.

This class satisfies 8 of the total 16 CEUs required for annual certification adherence.

**Please be advised that December 31st is the deadline for completion of the 16 CEUs for the year.

Live Anger Management Facilitator Training

October, 27, 28, 29, 2010
8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Anderson & Anderson
12301 Wilshire Blvd.

Suite 418
Los Angeles, CA 90025

(310) 207-3591

Cost: $500.00 per day includes client workbook, facilitator guide, and certification.

Anderson & Anderson APC

 Anger Management Guru: George Anderson, BCD, LCSW, CAMF

 Three Day Live Anger Management Training Experience

Approved for 8 CEU’s by CAADAC (#2n96-341-0805), BBS (#PCE60), CAADE (#CP40-793-C-1009), TCBAP, and the

CA. Board of Corrections

 The Anderson & Anderson model of anger management is the most effective and widely recognized curriculum in the world. This model, which has been featured in Los Angeles Times Magazine, focuses on enhancing emotional intelligence and assertive communication while introducing behavior strategies for identifying and managing anger and stress. Our certification training and approved provider list are the industry standards and dominate the internet.

 The First day of training will focus on Adolescent Anger Management and will use the Anderson workbook “Controlling Ourselves” as the text. A demonstration and discussion of the Conover Assessment Component will be conducted. This one-day training is designed for Nurses, School Counselors/Psychologists, Substance Abuse Counselors, Case Managers, HR Managers, Clinicians, Probation Officers, as well as staff from group homes, and agencies serving families and youth. This curriculum is currently being used in school districts in Los Angeles, Oakland, Sacramento, Concord and San Diego, as well as school districts in Texas and Louisiana. In addition, probation departments in Arizona, Kansas, California and Texas use this model.

 On the Second day, Adult Anger Management will be examined. A demonstration of the Conover Assessment will be conducted with a discussion of its usefulness. “Gaining Control of Ourselves,” in conjunction with experiential exercises and videos, will be used to initiate the participants to this intervention. Most major corporations have accepted this model for use by H.R. and EAP Managers.

 The Third day of Training is Organizational Emotional Intelligence/ Anger Management. This training is designed to prepare the participant to offer workshops or presentations regarding anger management, civility or emotional intelligence a small group format. This is rapidly becoming one of the most requested interventions in anger management. This training has been conducted for Kaiser Permanente of Southern California the Riverside County Medical Association as well as the Illinois State Bar Association.

Participants who attend all three days of this training will receive a free CD containing a 16 hour course on Motivational Interviewing. This in addition to the above three days will give the participant the required 40 hours of Facilitator Certification Training.

Each training day counts for 8 of the total of 40 hours required for Certification.

 **This training is also available on interactive CD’s.

What’s New In Anger Management

Forget about court mandated defendants dominating anger management groups. Forget about most anger management  being offered in a small group format. Certified Anger Management Facilitators throughout the U.S. are reporting a remarkably different client population.

Lets take a look at the changing client population of trained anger management providers:

1). Caucasian males who are college graduates are seeking assistance at the request of their significant others.

2). Teenage girls and boys are voluntarily seeking anger management to enhance communication skills and emotional intelligence. They want to be more popular.

3). Psychologists and Psychiatrists are referring their clients for specific help in managing stress and anger.

4). Family law court attorneys and judges are referring clients who are in bitter divorce disputes.

5). Artists agents are referring their celebrity clients for assistance in increasing their emotional intelligence.

The most noticeable change is the move from groups to individual coaching for skill enhancement in emotional intelligence.

Anger Management

Published by Business Link

Right now we might be forgiven for feeling angry about something. Recession has impacted our personal and professional lives, and doing business is getting tougher. In the midst of such adversity, negative emotions could easily overtake positivity. So what should we do with such anger? Bottle up and battle on, or let it out?

The individual contextResearch suggests that, when properly managed, anger can become a productive and beneficial emotion which can aid career development and improve mental health.The Harvard Medical School followed 800 people over 44 years, and found that individuals who repressed frustration were three times more likely to reach a ‘glass ceiling’ in their careers. The study was however careful to point out that ‘outright fury’ is destructive, and emphasized  the importance of remaining in control.

Professor George, lead author of the report, said:“People think of anger as a terribly dangerous emotion and are encouraged to practise ‘positive thinking’, but we find that approach is self-defeating and ultimately a damaging denial of dreadful reality. Negative emotions are often crucial for survival. Careful experiments such as ours have documented that negative emotions narrow and focus attention so we can concentrate on the trees instead of the forest.”

Professor Vaillant, director of the Study of Adult Development, the publishers of the research, comments:“Individuals who learn how to express their anger while avoiding the explosive and self-destructive consequences of unbridled fury have achieved something incredibly powerful in terms of overall emotional growth and mental health.”

The business context feelings of anger and frustration can quickly become destructive and undermine the morale of an entire company. But conversely, negative emotions can provide impetus for positive change and business improvement. According to Harvard’s research, negative emotions are often crucial for survival, and can help us narrow and focus attention to concentrate on the trees instead of the forest. Encouraging employees to express their negative emotions could therefore allow businesses to focus on specific problems and spur positive change. Such change could lead to improvements in product or service, or in customer or back-end processes. Turning negativity into improvement also has the important secondary benefit of improving employee morale, motivation and productivity.

Essentially, anger management requires an open and controlled company culture which encourages employees to express negativity in the least destructive ways. Effective employee consultation is key to ensuring this happens. And while the outcome of consultation may not always be mutually satisfactory, individuals will usually feel less frustrated simply for being given the change to have their say and listen to alternative perspectives.

In cases where anger or frustration is justified, businesses should take note and work to improve circumstances and minimize future grievances. Mechanisms for expressing anger could include individual feedback sessions, or group brainstorming , which aims to facilitate frank discussions on how to overcome difficulties and improve things.

Whatever the mechanism, it is important to listen, communicate fairly but firmly, and follow up with strong processes for responding to feedback.

How to Avoid Scams in “Disruptive Physician” Referrals

Now that hospitals and healthcare organizations are moving to implement the Joint Commissions Policy on “disruptive physician” behavior, unscrupulous providers are suddenly claiming expertise in providing: anger management for physicians, coaching for angry physicians, psychotherapy for disruptive physicians and even inpatient treatment for physician rageaholics.

Consider the following strategies to avoid being victimized by fraudulent “disruptive physician” provider:

1.    Contact the two University Medical School providers and ask for their recommendations if they are unable to accommodate you or your referral. These two providers are The PACE Program at the University of San Diego, School of Medicine and The Vanderbilt University School of Medicine’s Distressed Physician Program. Both of these programs are non-profit and therefore not motivated by volume.

2.    Contact the American Medical Association as well as you state and or medical association for a local or reputable on-site provider.

3.    Request a referral from your Hospital’s Physician Well-Being Committee.

4.    Conduct your own Internet Search and follow-up by asking for a list of client Health Care Organizations for which the potential provider has offered Pre and Post Assessments and Coaching for “disruptive physicians”.

5.    Make certain that you are not the first client of any provider.

6.    On-line services should be seen as a red flag for any provider. Only live services in small groups or individually are acceptable for intervention for disruptive behavior.

7.    Beware of drug abuse or psychiatric treatment for disruptive behavior. Disruptive behavior is neither an addition nor a pathological condition. Therefore, no one should risk his or her professional career by seeking such radical intervention for problem behavior.

Intervention for disruptive behavior can and should be a positive experience for all involved. All legitimate programs begin with a non-psychiatric assessment followed by a structured intervention designed to teach skills in anger management, stress management, communication, emotional intelligence as well as leadership, social awareness and relationship management.

George Anderson, MSW, BCD, CAMF