Anger Management Coaching Can Be Lucrative

The secrets to making money and changing lives with Emotional Intelligence/Anger Management is expert training, CAMF which is Certified Anger Management Facilitator Certification, curricula, EQ assessments, client workbooks and social media marketing.

It is not at all unusual to earn an average of $50,000 per year by working 12 hours per week. This can be accomplished by providing small group classes, individual coaching, Emotional Intelligence Assessments as well as Organizational Anger Management training for violence prevention, hostile work environments and anger management intervention for business and industry.

Take a look at the enclosed article from Business Week:

Anger Management Goes to the Doctor

By Chase Scheinbaum on August 02, 2012

In an operating room at a large regional hospital, George Anderson opted to sit on a low metal stool. He had no interest in the patient undergoing open-heart surgery. Instead, he positioned himself to have a good angle on the surgeon’s face. Asked by the hospital to help the cardiac specialist curb his explosive tantrums, Anderson, an anger management expert, watched carefully for signs of irritation. For a while, the surgeon worked steadily, but then, just as he sewed a valve into the patient’s heart, his phone buzzed. He took the call. Not a friendly one, evidently. He cursed and screamed into his hands-free headset for about a minute before abruptly hanging up. No one uttered a word. “Everyone in the room was stunned,” says Anderson, 73, in his soothing Mississippi accent.

In an earlier blowup, the doctor had torn into an anesthesiologist and attorneys were calling—even while he was in the OR. (Because of confidentiality rules, Anderson will only identify the doctor as one of the “top bypass surgeons” in the country.) If the surgeon couldn’t keep his rage in check, he would lose his job and the hospital would possibly be penalized, to say nothing of the patients under his scalpel. After the operation, the surgeon took off his latex gloves, threw them on the floor, and left the operating room in silence.

Anderson & Anderson, the business Anderson founded 30 years ago in Los Angeles, has trained and certified at least 11,000 anger management specialists. Lockheed Martin (LMT), Halliburton (HAL), and United Parcel Service (UPS) have used his services to ward off lawsuits and dust-ups, as has the federal prison system. He was even tapped to consult on Anger Management, the 2003 Adam Sandler/Jack Nicholson comedy.

Over his career, Anderson has had clients from a variety of industries, including athletes, cops, and business executives (though as yet no JetBlue (JBLU) flight attendants). Last year, for the first time, more than a third of his income came from medical workers; this year he expects to add 125 more of them, sent to him because of their inability to manage the pressures of the job. Asks Anderson: “Can you imagine the amount of stress a doctor experiences just by waking up in the morning?

”The unflappable George Anderson

Medical professionals present Anderson with unique challenges. Their hours are brutal, the stakes are high, and the threat of malpractice suits is ever-present. The life-or-death nature of the work wears at steely nerves even on the best days, Anderson says. Many doctors work long hours at the expense of family and exercise, which can dissolve tension. One doctor laughed in his face when he suggested she take a vacation. There’s another factor to consider: Since 2010, doctors’ pay has stagnated, with some specialties weathering a 10 percent cut.

Anderson was among the first of his peers to capitalize on the boom of rageaholic caregivers. It began in earnest in 2009 when the Joint Commission, an independent body that is the largest accreditor of medical programs, mandated that hospitals deal with “disruptive” docs. In one study, published in American Journal of Nursing in 2002, 90 percent of hospital workers, including doctors and nurses, reported “yelling” and “abusive language,” along with “condescension” and “berating colleagues.” A quarter of the 1,200 people in that survey said they witnessed such behavior weekly. “There isn’t a doctor alive who hasn’t seen it,” says William Norcross, executive director of a program at the University of California at San Diego that uses anger management to treat irascible physicians.

Consider increasing your income by gaining your CAMF and offering these services.

George Anderson, CAMF

310-207-3591 or


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